Category Archives: Georgia Bulldogs

Brice Ramsey, We Barely Knew Ye


Back in the summer of 2015, the whole DudeYouCrazy braintrust reached a consensus. With the loss of Mike Bobo and the laughable hire of Brian Schottenheimer, any objective observer knew the offense would lose its spacing in the run game and its aggressiveness through the air.

We wanted Brice Ramsey, QB1, Georgia Bulldogs. We never got our wish. Instead, things went from bad to worse in a hurry, as our Schottenheimer nightmares were further buoyed by the wholly unexciting transfer of Greyson Lambert. I wrote the following:

While I could’ve lived with Golson at the helm, the news that Lambert is now considering heading to Athens with two years’ eligibility remaining horrifies me. It tells me that a) maybe Ramsey isn’t as ready as I thought; and b) to the extent that we’d take a flier on a guy who was somewhere below mediocre at Virginia.

Below mediocre, you ask? Lambert’s 2014 numbers: 154/261 (59%), 10 TD, 11 INT, raw QBR of 45.1 (QBR is ESPN’s method of evaluating quarterbacks on a 1-100 scale versus replacement and adjusted for situation- if you see me talking QB’s I’ll probably reference it). Against ACC competition? That QBR dips to 39.5, with a paltry 6.5 yards per attempt. In fact, Lambert’s only non-pedestrian performances came against BYU (71.1 QBR) and Richmond (92.2, YAAAAYYYYY).

Even Jason Smith, who wrote about football quarterly in a good year, chimed in:

So while most predict that Brice Ramsey will still be the starter come opening day, the speculation will only ramp up as to how solid that prediction actually is. Moreover, if Ramsey is named the starter there will inevitably be a huge swath of fans wondering why on earth you decide to pursue Lambert in the first place.

Take all of that into consideration and this new transfer has already put the 2015 season into a chaotic register, but I don’t think its as bad as some folks will make it out to be.

The consensus we reached was this: Greyson Lambert seeing the field for the University of Georgia was bad. We hoped Brice Ramsey could save Schottenheimer from himself, but apparently the prospect of seeing him on the field was worse than the mediocrity to which we were subjected by Lambert.

To his credit, Ramsey was a good sport about it. He tantalized us with his arm talent (and frustrated us with his bad reads) in spot duty in 2014 and 2015. He took over as the punter, of all things, for parts of the ’15 and ’16 seasons. And he was last seen in Rodrigo Blankenship’s claim that “even the backup punter has a scholarship”, when the backup punter happened to be one Brice Ramsey.

Given the events of the past two years, one ponders an alternate universe where Ramsey lives up to his billing as the nation’s 6th-ranked pro-style QB. Does his ability to actually throw a 15-yard out make the 2015 Bulldogs more explosive? Does he save Mark Richt’s job? I have to imagine that he’d have tried to be a little more efficient given a longer leash, but that’s based on nothing but my vindicated fears of a Greyson Lambert-led offense.

We never got the chance to find out. It probably would’ve been more fun if we did.

Unfortunately, we’ll never know. Ramsey may go down in the ethos of Georgia football as the recruiting bust who cost Mark Richt his job, or the quarterback-turned-punter who found a way onto the field in order to try to help his team win.

But here’s to you, Brice Ramsey, I hope the grad transfer choose-your-own-adventure leads you to a Jeff Driskel/Louisiana Tech redemption tour (or hell, aim higher if you want), where you’re put in a position to throw for 4,500 yards.

Georgia Football: National Signing Day Was a Huge Win for the Bulldogs


Note: Unless specifically noted all rankings, ratings, etc. via the 247Sports Composite. Also, publish time on this bad boy was 6:00 p.m. ET on February 1, 2017. So pardon any developments in the evening.

There’s an awful lot to like about Georgia’s 2017 recruiting class, but if you’re a light follower of recruiting like myself (and like Chad) it may be hard to know where to begin. So with that in mind, I’ve sifted through the rough to find the five diamonds that you—an avid follower of recruiting or a casual Georgia fan—will find most encouraging.

Hurley was a 5-star.

Hurley was a 5-star.

1. This is Georgia’s Best Class Ranking—Maybe Ever

If you believe in college football rankings, then this is the best Georgia recruiting class ever. I believe in rankings because 1. The correlation between success in recruiting and success in games is rich and 2. The correlation between individual player ratings and NFL futures is rich. I’ve talked about this at length so do some research if you’re a nerd (check this out).

So, as a believer this class is insane relative to Georgia’s already high standards.

The 247Sports Composite (which combines all major recruiting services) has the Bulldogs ranked third in the nation. They’ve never finished higher (data going back to 2000). The 2006 class was also third (but with a lower average rating, fewer 5-star signees and fewer 4-star signees).

Rivals.com has Georgian ranked third as well. That’s the best recorded on the site (which posts data since 2002).

Scout.com pegs Georgia with the second-best class in the nation. The Bulldogs have never topped that spot.

ESPN tabs the Dawgs as the nation’s third-best class. Again, this is the best class reported by the site.

So if you buy that class rankings matter, this is an epic success for Kirby Smart! Even if you buy the myth that Georgia out-recruits its peers (it doesn’t: See Alabama, LSU and Florida over the past decade), this is a huge class.

 

2. This Class is Incredible – Numerically Speaking

Georgia’s average recruit rating (per 247Sports) is 92.71. That’s the third-best tally in the nation behind Ohio State (94.47) and Alabama (93.61). That’s really a fantastic number. Consider other elite classes in the last ten years (2017 classes italicized).

  1. 2017 Ohio State (94.47)
  2. 2015 Alabama (93.64)
  3. 2017 Alabama (93.61)
  4. 2014 Alabama (93.59)
  5. 2010 Florida (93.55)
  6. 2010 Texas (93.55)
  7. 2013 Alabama (93.25)
  8. 2009 USC (93.16)
  9. 2012 Alabama (93.09)
  10. 2016 Alabama (92.85)
  11. 2017 Georgia (92.71)

Now, the numbers above just represent individual player averages. Another way to look at this would be by evaluating 247Sports (again, they compile all sites’ data) total class ratings. For 2017 the Top 5 classes are as follows:

  1. Alabama: 322.53
  2. Ohio State: 310.97
  3. Georgia 300.98
  4. Southern Cal: 296.12
  5. Michigan: 293.77

Those numbers take things into account like actual class size. In other words, these ratings give preference to Alabama’s 29 signees over Ohio State’s 21, even though the average rating of committed Buckeyes was higher. This is a combination of quality and  quantity.

Where does Georgia’s rating of 300.98 stack up historically? Consider how many classes bested that total over the past ten years:

  • 2017: 2 (Alabama, Ohio State)
  • 2016: 1 (Alabama)
  • 2015: 2 (Alabama, Southern Cal)
  • 2014: 1 (Alabama)
  • 2013: 2 (Alabama, Ohio State)
  • 2012: 1 (Alabama)
  • 2011: 0
  • 2010: 2 (Florida, Texas)
  • 2009: 0
  • 2008: 0

3. This Was NOT a Weak National Class – Georgia Just Killed It

The bullet-points above support this case. At worst, Georgia’s class rating of 300.98 would rank third among its peers in any class over the past decade. And, this class would only rank third four times in the last ten years (this year, 2015, 2013 and 2010). So by that measure, this is a strong national class. Case in point, it would have been the second-best class in the nation in 2016, 2014 and 2012. It would have been the best class in 2011, 2009 and 2008.

  • Best Class in 2008: Notre Dame (294.67)
  • Best Class in 2009: LSU (291.33)
  • Best Class in 2011: Alabama (298.50).

Further, consider how the nation’s third-best class has held up each of the ten years prior to 2017.

Year No. 3 Class Average Rating Total Rating 5-Star 4-Star
2016 LSU 91.15 291.06 2 16
2015 Florida State 92.41 285.69 4 10
2014 Ohio State 86.6 296.06 1 15
2013 Florida 90.69 291.48 2 13
2012 Florida State 92.71 287.73 5 9
2011 Southern Cal 89.4 286.99 1 14
2010 Southern Cal 90.9 293.22 4 12
2009 Southern Cal 93.16 285.69 2 12
2008 Alabama 90.51 289.05 3 18
2007 Tennessee 88.6 282.81 2 12
Average 90.613 288.978 2.6 13.1

Now Consider Georgia’s 2017 class:

Category Result Better Than No. 3 Class AVG Rank Among Previous 10 Classes
Average Rating 92.71 YES Tied – 2nd
Total Rating 300.98 YES First
5-Star Players 2 NO Tied – 5th
4-Star Players 18 YES First
5 & 4-Star Players 20 YES First

 

4. Georgia Landed Elite Players All Over The Field

  • Richard LeCounte III is the no. 2 safety prospect in the country.
  • Jake Fromm is the the no. 3 Pro-Style QB in the country.
  • Deangelo Gibbs is the no. 4 safety in the country.
  • D’Andre Swift is the no. 4 running back in the country.
  • Malik Herring is the no. 4 strong-side defensive end in the country.
  • Isaiah Wilson is the no. 5 offensive tackle in the country.
  • Nate McBride is the no. 6 inside linebacker in the country.
  • Netori Johnson is the no. 7 offensive guard in the country.
  • Robert Beal is the no. 8 weak-side defensive end in the country.
  • Jaden Hunter is the no. 9 outside linebacker in the country.
  • Andrew Thomas is the no. 9 offensive tackle in the country.
  • D’Marcus Hayes is the no. 2 JUCO offensive tackle in the country.

In total, 12 new Georgia signees rank among the nation’s Top 10 at their respective position. Six play offense, six play defense.

Seventeen of the nation’s Top 200 high school prospects signed with Georgia. That’s staggering. Only Alabama snagged more Top 200 players (with 18).

 

5. Georgia Locked Down the State

I do think in-state recruiting can get a bit blown out of proportion. Get the best players you can get; I don’t care where they’re from.  But by practically every measure Georgia held its own in Peach State.

The state’s top prospect was a QB, Davis Mills, heading to Stanford.  He’s regarded as the top QB in the class. Georgia got the third-best Pro-Style passer in the class (Fromm) and the No. 2 Pro-Style QB last year (Eason), so it’s not a shock that Mills went elsewhere. Aubrey Solomon, no. 3 in the state and the nation’s second-best DT went to Michigan.

Outside of that, it’s hard to find much fault with what Georgia did in-state.

Five of the Top 10 players in the state are staying home. In addition to Mills and Solomon, Georgia missed on three defensive backs—AJ Terrell, Xavier McKinney and Jaymest Williams were ranked 7th, 8th and 9th in the state respectively. But, Georgia signed two DBs who ranked second (LeCounte) and 6th (Deangelo Gibbs) in the state.

Players 11-16 in the 247 Composite State Rankings ALL chose Georgia. So 11 of the Top 16 will suit of for the red and black.

 

That’s all I got/

Andrew

PODCAST: The Big Ten Has Surpassed the SEC…Even We Have to Admit It


Chad Floyd (@Chad_Floyd on Twitter) and Andrew Hall (@DudeYouCrazy) get together to discuss the week’s big headlines – Oregon’s coaching staff imploding, the NCAA’s money grab with early March Madness rankings, etc. Then, they take a closer look (at the request of a commenter) at the new King of College Football, the Big Ten Conference.

UPDATE: There seems to have been a recording issue, stay tuned if you want more than 5 minutes. TheUnit2K16 got his wish and we did a B1G podcast…and we are working to get the rest of it there. Leave a 5-star review and we may talk about your subject of choice.

 

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PODCAST: Is Auburn the Georgia Tech of the SEC? How Lazy are Oregon’s Football Players? Will Georgia Win Any Football Games Next Year?


Chad Floyd (@Chad_Floyd on the Twitter Machine) is joined by Andrew Hall (@DudeYouCrazy) for a spirited discussion about all things football. The two great minds discuss the Atlanta Falcons and their final game in the Georgia Dome, Georgia’s 2017 schedule and how wimpy Oregon’s football players are.

 

 

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Fixing College Football, Part I of ?: Doing Away With Divisions


Divisions in Power 5 conferences are stupid. There, I said it.

At a time where revenues are such that all away games, with few exceptions, call for chartered flights, I don’t buy the monetary concern. When preserving the ‘sanctity’ of a Georgia/Kentucky or Mississippi State/LSU rivalry, I don’t care. And following another season similar to the last few, where:

  • The SEC East is a complete dumpster fire, where 5 West teams could have easily won it.
  • Clemson and Florida State carry the crown for the ACC and play in the same division.
  • Ohio State, Michigan, and Penn State (and Michigan State, until 2016) play in the same division because of geography, and THAT’S A BETTER SYSTEM THAN THE ONE THEY HAD IN PLACE!

I’m adapting from a model Bill Connelly posited on SBNation this summer, because its a fascinating thought exercise, and it makes too much sense. In it:

  • The Pac-12, with divisions and a 9-game schedule, is fine for now.
  • The Big XII, jumbled mess as it is, has a round-robin (and a conference championship game starting next year, because SPORTS).

For the three fourteen-team conferences, division play doesn’t work. Unless you look forward to Georgia’s FIRST trip to conference rival Texas A&M during the end of Trump’s second term. Or your next trip to the Grove in 2029.

I’m not down for that. I’m not down for watching the Missouris and Floridas of the world get PASTED in the SEC Championship. I (Bill C first) want the following: keep an eight-game schedule, with three annual rivals and a rotation through the other 10 teams on a semiannual basis. Meaning, instead of going Mark Richt’s whole tenure before playing an SEC West opponent twice, you play a home-and-home with everyone every four years.

I’ll workshop this for all 42 teams involved below, but an example of what this would look like for Georgia:

Primary rivals: Auburn, Florida, South Carolina

Year 1: Alabama, at Kentucky, Ole Miss, at Missouri, Vanderbilt
Year 2: at Arkansas, LSU, at Mississippi State, Tennessee, at Texas A&M

Done in four-year cycles, one could even adapt years 3 and 4 from the first two to account for random shifts in competitive balance. Perhaps pair off each team for their non-rivals, so Kentucky doesn’t draw Alabama and Auburn, Mizzou doesn’t draw Georgia and Florida, etc.

This is the best I could come up with from a “PRESERVE OUR RIVALRIES!” perspective (and this may match Connelly verbatim, but I’m not checking):

Team Rival Rival Rival
Alabama Auburn Tennessee Ole Miss
Arkansas Mizzou Texas A&M LSU
Auburn Alabama Georgia Miss State
Florida Georgia Tennessee South Carolina
Georgia Florida Auburn South Carolina
Kentucky Missouri Vanderbilt South Carolina
LSU Texas A&M Miss State Arkansas
Mississippi Miss State Vanderbilt Alabama
Mississippi State Ole Miss LSU Auburn
Missouri Arkansas Kentucky Texas A&M
South Carolina Georgia Florida Kentucky
Tennessee Vanderbilt Florida Alabama
Texas A&M LSU Arkansas Mizzou
Vanderbilt Tennessee Kentucky Ole Miss

Some thoughts: South Carolina and Kentucky were SUPER hard to place. Kentucky gets, from a historical perspective, the easiest three games of anyone. Off the top of my head, there are no major rivalries that go unprotected, with the exception of Alabama/LSU (a more recent one, anyway).

The biggest misses? Tennessee/Kentucky, as Kentucky gets screwed out of the one game they get really worked up about. Bama/LSU, obviously.

I’d give myself a 10/10 for this. A&M, Arkansas, Mizzou, and LSU all preserve their regional rivalries. South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Florida all keep many of theirs. Vanderbilt/Ole Miss in the Khaki Bowl is still an annual event. Bama maintains history with Tennessee and Ole Miss, in addition to (obviously) Auburn.

If you don’t care about the ACC, you can stop reading now. Tried to draw it up there as well, but it is MUCH harder with the four North Carolina schools and the ‘old vs. new’ mentality that persists behind the scenes:

Team Rival Rival Rival
Boston College Syracuse Pitt Clemson
Clemson Georgia Tech N.C. State BC
Duke North Carolina Wake Forest Louisville
Florida State Miami Wake Forest N.C. State
Georgia Tech Clemson Miami Virginia
Louisville Pitt Virginia Tech Duke
Miami Florida St. Georgia Tech Syracuse
North Carolina Duke N.C. State Virginia
N.C. State North Carolina Clemson Florida State
Pitt Louisville BC Syracuse
Syracuse BC Miami Pitt
Virginia Virginia Tech North Carolina Georgia Tech
Virginia Tech Virginia Louisville Wake Forest
Wake Forest Duke Florida State Virginia Tech

This was friggin’ impossible. So many games that don’t make sense, especially for the Florida schools and the Northern schools, who would indubitably want games in the fertile Florida recruiting grounds.

Competitive balance, as it stands now, is a problem. N.C. State gets hosed, while UNC, Virginia Tech, and Pitt get relatively easy runs. I thought I’d be able to place Miami with more than one old Big East rival, but no dice.

For the B1G, I quit because I don’t care. But they need it worse than anyone else.

What do you think? Should we do away with divisions in order to make the conference feel like a conference again? Did I blow it on any rivalries?

 

 

 

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